They often told us since grade school: Start the day with a good breakfast! But while eating breakfast does seem to boost performance in children, it’s not so clear whether it’s equally important for adults.

While a number of studies have suggested that skipping breakfast can cause fuzzy thinking and fatigue, some experts say that the evidence is not convincing. Studies on human performance indicate that people who regularly skip breakfast may actually experience an energy slump on occasions when they do eat it. Dr. Arthur Frank, MD, medical director of the Obesity Management Program at George Washington University Hospital in Washington D. C. is not opposed to the idea of having breakfast, “you shouldn’t feel obligated to eat it”, he says. “Follow your body’s lead. ”

Of course, if you frequently find yourself feeling tired as the day wears on, skipping breakfast could be making the problem worse, says Wahida Karmally, DrPH, RD, CDE, director of nutrition of the Irving Center for Clinical Research at Columbia University Medical Centre. She recommends starting the day with a breakfast that is high in complex carbohydrates blended with protein-whole-grain cereal with low-fat or fat-free milk and fresh fruit, for example, or whole-wheat toast topped with low-fat cheese.

We recommend adding one of USANA’s Macro-optimizers to your breakfast. They contain complex carbohydrates, dietary fiber for more energy, soy protein and potassium in the right ratio’s, with a low glycemic index of 23. You can read more about macronutrients in one of the following sections. Children who eat breakfast are more likely to have better concentration, problem-solving skills, and hand-eye coordination.

The State of Minnesota Breakfast Study showed that “students who ate breakfasts before starting school had a general increase in math grades and reading scores, increased student attention, reduced nurse visits and increased student behaviors. ”

Eating only sugary foods may cause your child to have erratic energy levels, it actually spikes their blood sugar levels which can cause type 2 diabetes. Eating a balanced breakfast will help get them going and sustain their energy until lunchtime.

A healthy breakfast does not have to take a lot of time. Stick to the basics and serve simple foods that are nutritious and quick in the morning. For ideas, here are ten tips for nourishing ways to kick-start the day.

Ten tips for a healthier breakfast.

1. Oatmeal in an instant

Instant oatmeal is great on a cold morning and contains fiber and vitamins. Choose oatmeal that isn’t already pre-sweetened. Sweeten it with raisins or fresh fruit.

2. Smoothie madness

Blend frozen fruit(bananas and berries are great), low-fat or fat-free milk and 100% fruit-juice for a quick, tasty breakfast smoothie with lots of nutrients.

3. Go 100% whole grain

100% whole-grain, fiber-containing cereals served with low-or fat-free milk are a healthier alternative to sugary cereals. Whole-wheat muffins with smashed banana are also easy and tasty.

4. Eggxactly!

Boil, scramble or poach eggs and serve on whole-wheat toast they’re packed with nutrition and in appropriate portions, are great for kids.

5. Toaster Treats

Frozen, whole-grain waffles take almost no time to make. Top them with berries, low sugar apple-sauce or sliced bananas instead of syrup.

6. Go Nutty!

Spreading peanut or almond butter on whole-grain toast is great to get both protein and fiber.

7. Go Fruity!

A fresh fruit cut up with a dollop of low-fat or fat-free yogurt is a great way to start the day. Apples contain fiber and bananas contain potassium.

8. Try All-Fruit Spreads.

Instead of butter or margarine on toast, try all-fruit spreads, fruit butter, or even sliced bananas or strawberries.

9. Bagel Classics

Try a whole-wheat or sunflower seed bagel with low-fat cream cheese or peanut butter.

10. Breakfast On-the-Go

Don’t have time to eat breakfast at home? Keep whole-grain mini bagels on-hand or muffins or the USANA Nutrition bars (Iced lemon Fibergy Bar, Oatmeal Raisin or Peanut Crunch Nutrition Bars).

Related Article: Health and Nutrition Guide

Featured Image: Medical News Today
Source by Adrian Joele